tips-word-merge

Office Tip: Merging two Word documents

My project group were working on a concept document, which was saved in a Dropbox shared folder. Unfortunately, more than one of us were making changes simultaneously, and we ended up with two slightly different copies of the file: filename.docx, and filename (Joey Foo’s conflicted copy…).docx.

What the easiest way to merge the differences between two documents together? Answer: it’s built into Word itself.

On the ribbon, go into the Review tab, click Compare, then choose either Compare or Combine. I want to merge both documents into a single one, so I’ll choose the latter.

tips-word-merge0

In the window that opens, specify both the original document, and the revised document, then click okay.

tips-word-merge1

Word will open up a new window with the document for you to check through, along with both documents on the side for comparison.

tips-word-merge3

Check through the document, then save it to finish the process.

The Office suite is a very powerful set of tools: there are many more features and functions than what most people know of. If you need a function and don’t know if it exists, hit the F1 key on your keyboard to open Office’s help function, and do a search!

c751a

End of the road: openBVE add-on C751A v2.1

I have just published the very last release of the C751A add-on for openBVE, a free, open-source train simulator.

Unfortunately, development of openBVE has in recent months slowed down significantly. There has not been an update for months.

Version 2.1 will be the very last update to the relatively popular C751A add-on – a digital recreation of the 6-car Alstom North East Line trains.

To everyone who downloaded and enjoyed the add-on, a sincere thank you, for your support all the while.

This is the end of the road for the C751A add-on, and there will not be further updates, as I move on to pursue other interests.

-Joey


joeyfoo.com/openbve <- Download here
SGTrains forum thread

computercraft

Getting started with ComputerCraft!

This is the first in a series of posts on getting started from scratch – with ComputerCraft. I’m playing on a private Creative server (which sort of requested these tutorials), so these posts will cover computers more than turtles.

computercraft-workbenchIn this first post, we’ll cover the basics of using the command line: navigating, listing contents, and creating and deleting directories.

~~~

Alright, moving on! Let’s craft a computer!

crafting-computerUhh, yeah, just get a computer from the Creative inventory and place it down. If you’re playing in Survival, here’s the crafting recipe.

Next, right click on your computer.

Welcome to CraftOS! CraftOS is the default operating system that is found in your computer. It uses a command line interface, much like DOS, or the Command Prompt or Terminal on your actual machine.

You can issue commands on your computer. Let’s try ls. Type the command, then press enter. Also note: commands are case-sensitive!

ls stands for list, and is a command that lists all items in the current folder, also known as the directory.

commands-ls1Notice there is currently only one item in the directory, named “rom”. “rom” is a directory, standing for read only memory, and contains files that allows CraftOS to work. As its name suggests, you can only read items in rom, but you cannot change (or delete) them.

We’ll play with a few commands next: they are cd, mkdir, and rm.

Let’s start with mkdir, which stands for make directory. However, if you try to run mkdir, you will get this:

> mkdir
Usage: mkdir <path>

You need a name to name the folder! I’ll name my directory “name”, so I’ll run mkdir name. I’m not very creative with names.

If you try ls again, you’ll notice we now have a directory, named “name”.

You can navigate into that directory using cd, which stands for change directory. Enter cd name. You can see we are now in directory “name”.

Next, we will enter a series of commands.

mkdir name2
ls
cd name2

At the end, you will notice the area before your cursor states name/name2> . Commands take place inside where you currently are, as indicated there. When you are in folder “name”, and you create a folder, you will have a folder created inside of name.

commands-mkdirYour computer’s files and directories currently looks like this:

  • / (We call this the root directory)
    • /rom
    • /name
      • /name2 ( <– you are here)

To go upwards in the folder structure, you use .. (two dots). .. can be understood as “one level up”, so entering cd .. will bring you back to “name”.

Paths like name, name/name2 and .. are known as relative paths, because they are applied relative to where you are now.

Next, try cd /rom. You will navigate to “rom”, regardless of where you are.

Paths like “/rom” are known as relative paths, starting from the root directory, which in this case is indicated by the preceding / (slash). As a comparison, on Windows absolute paths looks like C:\Program Files.

Let’s now navigate back to root, by entering cd /, and listing the contents of root using ls.

Before we end this post, let’s clean up after ourselves by deleting the folders we have created. You can delete “name” and its contents (name2) using rm name. rm stands for remove, and works with both files and folders.

Notice that, unlike your usual computer, there is no confirmation prompts when deleting. Files and folders are immediately deleted, so always be careful with such commands.

Extra: If you try to rm rom, you will get an error:

> delete rom
delete:9: Access denied

This is because rom, as mentioned earlier, is read-only, so you cannot edit or delete it.

I’m moving content to joeyfoo.com.

You might have noticed I’ve updated my bio on some of my profiles, such as on Twitter. Yep, I’ve started a new personal website!

I’m in the process of moving non-blog content from this site to the new site. I’ve hidden all content from this site, so you’ll probably not find what you want here.

You may be looking for these:

  • About
  • Apps
  • Contact
  • Transport: still not yet migrated
    • openBVE: still not yet migrated
    • Paper bus templates: still not yet migrated

If there’s anything you want missing from this list, drop me a message, and I’ll look into it.

MAN A22 Lion's City-Gemilang SMB1420A 190 New SMRT Livery

In summary: the 2013 Fare Review Exercise

Singapore’s Public Transport Council has announced the completion of the 2013 Fare Review Exercise, which will see fares increase by 3.2% on average. New concession schemes and pricing are also introduced. As you will see, the biggest changes are in cash fares (up!), and concession pass prices (down!).

There has been quite a few articles, and very confusing explanations, so here is a summary of all the changes being introduced.

When does this take effect?

All changes will take effect on 6 April 2014.

Bus fares

Adult card fares will increase by 4 to 6 cents, depending on distance.

Bus trips below 4.2km will increase by 4 cents, from the 73-83 cents range to 77-87 cents.
Trips from 4.3km to 7.2km will increase by 5 cents, from 93-111 cents to 98-116 cents.
All trips above 7.3km will increase by 6 cents, from 117-196 cents to 123-202 cents.

Adult cash fares will all increase by 20 cents, and now starts at 130 cents for the shortest trips.

Senior citizen card fares below 7.2km will increase by 2 cents, from 54-82 cents to 56-84 cents. Trips over 7.3km will increase by 3 cents, from 87 cents to 90 cents.

All senior Citizen cash fares are up 10 cents throughout, from 90-120 cents to 100-130 cents.

Student card fares are up 2 cents throughout, from 36-58 cents to 38-60 cents. Cash fares are up 10 cents throughout, from 55/75 cents to 65/85 cents.

Trips on feeder services are already capped at 3.2km of normal trunk fares (i.e. the lowest distance tier).

Train fares

Train journeys have different fares: a slightly higher fare for North East, Circle, and Downtown lines, and a lower fare for East West, North South, and all LRT lines.

There are no special cash fares for students and senior citizens: this has always been the case, as a standard ticket is used for cash fare payments.

North East, Circle, and Downtown lines

For adult card fares:
Train trips below 4.2km will increase by 4 cents, from the 78-98 cents to 92-102 cents.
Trips from 4.3km to 7.2km will increase by 5 cents, from 108-126 cents to 113-131 cents.
All trips above 7.3km will increase by 6 cents, from 142-221 cents to 148-227 cents.

Adult cash fares will all increase by 20 cents, from 120-240 cents to 140-260 cents.

Senior citizen card fares for trips below 7.2km are up 2 cents, from 58-86 cents to 60-88 cents. Trips above 7.3km are up 3 cents, from 91 to 94 cents.

East West, North South, and all LRT lines

For adult card fares:
Train trips below 4.2km will increase by 4 cents, from the 73-83 cents to 77-87 cents.
Trips from 4.3km to 7.2km will increase by 5 cents, from 93-111 cents to 98-116 cents.
All trips above 7.3km will increase by 6 cents, from 117-196 cents to 123-202 cents.

Adult cash fares will all increase by 20 cents, from 110-220 cents to 130-240 cents.

Senior citizen card fares for trips below 7.2km are up 2 cents, from 54-82 cents to 56-84 cents. Trips above 7.3km are up 3 cents, from 87 to 90 cents.

Student card fares for trips below 7.2km are up 2 cents, from 36-55 cents to 38-57 cents. Trips above 7.3km are up 3 cents, from 58 to 60cents.

Monthly concession passes

Price reductions for students and NSFs: Polytechnic students now enjoy the same monthly concession pass prices as Secondary, Junior College, and ITE students. Full-time National Servicemen (NSFs) concession pass prices will be reduced to match university student prices. Hybrid passes have a general reduction in prices for all categories.

There will be a new unlimited monthly travel pass for Singaporeans and permanent residents (PRs), priced at $120. Also, there will be a new monthly unlimited travel pass for senior citizens priced at $60 (half of the adult pass).

Monthly Bus Concession Pass

Primary students: $22.50 (no change)
Secondary students: $27.50 (no change)
Polytechnic students: $27.50 (down from $52.00)
University students: $52.00 (no change)
NSFs: $52.00 (down from $61.00)

Monthly Train Concession Pass

Train concession passes will now allow for unlimited train rides (previously a maximum of 4 trips per day).

Primary students: $20.00 (no change)
Secondary students: $25.00 (no change)
Polytechnic students: $25.00 (down from $45.00)
University students: $45.00 (no change)
NSFs: $45.00 (down from $50.00)

Monthly Hybrid Concession Pass (Train+Bus), and
Monthly Adult and Senior Citizen Travel Pass

Hybrid concession passes will now allow for unlimited train rides in addition to unlimited bus rides (previously a maximum of 4 train trips per day).

There is a general reduction in prices for all categories, as well as new monthly travel passes for adults and senior citizens.

Primary students: $41.00 (down from $42.50)
Secondary students: $51.00 (down from $52.50)
Polytechnic students: $51.00 (down from $97.00)
University students: $85.00 (down from $97.00)
NSFs: $45.00 (down from $110.00)

Adult (Monthly Travel Pass): $120.00 (new pass)
Senior Citizen: $60.00 (new pass)

Other changes

All children below 7 years old will enjoy free travel before entering primary school.


As much as possible, I have tried to keep this post accurate. If there are any errors, please let me know, so I can fix them.

Occasional rambing, sometimes useful posts.

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